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Campsites and Holiday Parks in Norfolk

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48 bookable sites in Norfolk

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Why visit Norfolk?

The Broads National Park 

Nowhere in the UK is quite like The Broads National Park for inland navigation. Britain’s largest wetland has over 125 miles of waterways you can sail, paddle or motor down, most of which became open to river traffic after a period of peat-cutting during the Middle Ages. 

Here you can hire a craft for the day at Wroxham and make your own adventure or sit back, relax and take in the stunning scenery from a river cruise starting at Fairhaven Woodland and Water Garden near Norwich

One last thing – although they’re commonly called the Norfolk Broads, it’s also worth exploring the parts of the park that extend down into Suffolk, too…

90 miles of coastline 

As well as its extensive freshwater scenery, camping in Norfolk also makes it possible to get out to approximately 90 miles of gorgeous coastline. Most of the beaches here are wide and sandy and are often fringed by grassy dunes.

Whether it’s day trips to busting resorts like Cromer and Great Yarmouth or seeking out quieter spots along the Norfolk Coast Path, those who love the sea can be pretty sure to find what they’re looking for here. 

Norwich 

Whether you end up opting for a quiet woodland campsite, a stay in the Norfolk Broads or a beachfront holiday park, there’s one urban spot that you won’t want to miss.

Often described as one of England’s prettiest cities, Norwich is home to an impressive castle and cathedral. It also has an array of attractive parks and gardens, is the start point for the long-distance Marriott’s Way trail and has a vibrant food and drink scene. 

 

Norfolk’s best attractions

  • Appreciate Norfolk’s wide open spaces at country estates like Holkham Hall in Wells-next-the-Sea or Sandringham, a royal residence that’s been in the hands of the British monarchy since 1862.

  • Get some adrenaline pumping out of doors at Bewilderwood Norfolk, a treetop adventure park near Norwich.

  • Take a whistle-stop tour through The Broads National Park on the Bure Valley Railway between Wroxham and Aylsham, a market town nine miles north of Norwich

  • Head to Cromer for seaside attractions including a zoo, pier, golf club and historic lighthouse. 

 

Unexplored Norfolk

British wildlife safaris

For more under-the-radar entertainment, grab a pair of binoculars and head out to any one of Norfolk’s top-rated birdwatching spots. You might even catch a glimpse of rare birds like cranes, a species once extinct in Britain that was reintroduced here and is now flourishing in Norfolk’s wild wetlands. 

You might also like to head to Blakeney Point, a seal-watching spot roughly halfway between Hunstanton and Cromer. And there’s always the option of finding campsites in Norfolk with on-site fishing opportunities for a relaxed few hours surrounded by wildlife of all kinds.

Windmills 

Like the majority of East Anglia, Norfolk’s landscape is flat, low-lying and dotted with traditional windmills. As well as making a scenic addition to the county, they have been used over the years for grinding flour and draining the Norfolk Broads.

Those camping in Norfolk can either admire these mills while out on country walks or head to sites like Horsey Mill, Great Yarmouth or Bircham Windmill near King's Lynn to see their traditional machinery in action.

What lies beneath…

Norfolk’s coastline may look beautiful, but the county’s coast is home to one of the highest concentrations of shipwrecks in the British Isles. At Brancaster near Hunstanton, the remains of the SS Vina can be seen from the shore at low tide, while experienced divers (weather permitting) can join scuba trips to explore wrecks further out. 

Don’t fancy dealing with all that diving gear? Head to the Seahenge exhibit in King's Lynn to see Norfolk’s best-known prehistoric monument, discovered by chance under the sand in 1998.

 

Here’s how 

Ready to get exploring? Use our filters to find a site that’s a good fit or check out some of these popular options below: 

Still looking for inspiration? Have a look at our guide on cheap camping to get one step closer to your budget Norfolk break, or read our run-down on glamping if you’re after a bit of luxury.