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Rural accommodation providers should be given priority for brown signs, says Pitchup.com

Jun 4 2014 Posted by Samantha Marsh

Founder urges rural tourism businesses to oppose new government rules ahead of consultation closure on 12 June

Call for greater parity with major attractions 

As the Department of Transport awaits views on the proposition for revised Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2015, the founder of outdoor accommodation specialist Pitchup.com Dan Yates has ventured his own opinion on this controversial subject in relation to the brown signs that provide directions to heritage or leisure attractions. 

Tourist signs have long been a source of contention for businesses who want them but have been denied the option by local councils, who are keen to avoid additional street clutter. With the government looking to reduce the number of brown signs even further, there is a clear divide between what the government wants and what is actually beneficial to both businesses and the tourist. 

Yates is keen to highlight the benefits to the traveller, as well as the more obvious benefits to the business owner of having visible roadside signage for businesses with limited passing trade. 

“The most rural businesses in the accommodation sector can be poorly detailed in satnavs and online maps, making them easy to miss – and for guests arriving after dark, it can prove at best frustrating, and at worst unsafe. It seems unfair that major attractions  - which are usually very easy to find -  are given priority when it comes to signage,” said Yates.

He continued: “From a driver’s perspective, it’s very important to have the correct signage, especially if you're trying to find a camping or caravan site in the countryside. Imagine towing a 30ft-tourer or driving an RV down a tiny rural road only to find it’s the wrong way or impassable for such vehicles. Brown signs would effectively eliminate this problem and make it easier and safer for all.”

Yates predicts that if the government goes ahead with plans to reduce the number of brown signs available and makes them available only to major attractions, there will be more cases of drivers taking the wrong routes (perhaps misguided by satnav) and finding themselves in tricky situations on narrow rural roads.

Yates urges rural tourism businesses to oppose the new guidance and lobby government to ensure a fair system for all. 

The consultation paper is open until 12 June 2014 and can be found online at https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310060/consultation-document.pdf

For more information about Dan Yates and Pitchup.com visit the website.

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For media information:

Cass.helstrip@whitetigerpr.com 07968 255464

Samantha.marsh@whitetigerpr.com 07711 265666

Rob.bates@whitetigerpr.com 07957 316491

Notes to editors:

Founded in 2009 by former lastminute.com man, Dan Yates, multi-award winning Pitchup.com is a free guide to all types of outdoor accommodation in the UK, Ireland and selected parts of Europe.  The site provides users with a simple platform in which they can search and book an outdoor holiday with total ease.  The customer experience from landing on the home page through to booking a holiday can be completed in as little as four pages.  The site also goes beyond traditional searches by allowing users to search for accommodation based on more than 80 criteria, such as adults only and campfires allowed, and view nearby events, Good Pub Guide pubs and VisitBritain attractions.  It’s also possible to check out bathing water quality in the surrounding area.  Users can also search on the offers page to find the best deals available.  Pitchup.com features over 5,000 UK wide camping and caravanning sites/parks with European destinations continually being added into the equation.  It enables users to search for all types of parks and sites from the major brands right through to one off campsites and unique outdoor accommodation options, which may not have previously had a web presence.